Abandon All Commas, Ye Who Enter Here

Image result for Commelina communisThe Story of an Hour, by Kate Chopin – a perennial favorite.

My own perennial favorite: Commelina communis, or the Asiatic Dayflower.

Happily, Student has most excellent ideas to write about – we will work together to tidy up the grammar so the ideas get the most excellent grade they deserve.

 

  • “The Story on an Hour” by Kate Chopin, which was first published in the year 1884 uses irony as an effective literary device

COMMA ALERT: which was signals a side phrase, which should be set off with commas at either end. Add another comma after the date.

Department of Redundancy Department: 1884 is pretty clearly a year. The written text does not need to specify.

  • This can be understood in a primarily medical sense, but Mrs. Mallard’s presumed frailty seems to be largely a result of psychological repression rather than truly physiological factors.

COMMA ALERT: contrasting phrase coming up! Add a comma.

  • The reader sees Mrs. Mallard’s first reactions as Josephine try to break the news very gently of the news of her husband’s death.

Department of Redundancy Department: The reader sees Mrs. Mallard’s first reactions as Josephine tries to very gently break the news of her husband’s death.

  • During that time women did not find their own partner but had arranged marriages.

COMMA ALERT: Introductory phrase needs a pause before starting the rest of the sentence.

COMMA ALERT: contrasting phrase coming up! Add a comma.

  • ‘In the story of an Hour” there she made mention of his “kind, tender hands and his face looking at her with love.

Fix the quotes and capitals: In “The story of an Hour”

Department of Redundancy Department:  American English does not need a place-holder noun to emphasize where the idea is coming from.

  • Only Mrs. Mallard new the bittersweet moments they had together, however she is prepare to overcome it.

COMMA ALERT: However is one of those rare words that needs punctuation on both sides.

PRONOUN CLARITY: What is ‘it’?  Student “the loss of her husband”. Me –  so use that phrase instead.

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